Closet Stages: Joanna Baillie and the Theater Theory of British Romantic Women Writers

By Catherine B. Burroughs | Go to book overview

to my project; and Sue Lifson, for her tireless and swift procurement of many interlibrary materials. Other individuals at Cornell College who, in a variety of ways, gave their support to this project are Carol Brokel, Diane Crowder, Helen Damon Moore, Tony DeLaubenfels, Alison Ames Galstad, Diane Harrington, Jan Lehr, Roberta Ringold, and Karen Seeman. Student assistants Paige Davis, Sarah Gatson, Gretchen Niemiec, Sarah Peel, and Kristi Robinson were extremely helpful in ways too numerous to mention. My colleagues in the Cornell College English Department—Robert Dana, David Evans, Leslie Hankins, Scott Klein, Stephen Lacey, Tim Liu, Richard Martin, and Ann Reckling—nurtured the development of this work by helping to create a congenial climate for teaching. I especially appreciate the contributions to this book of Steve Lacey—that “orchestrator of private gaiety, curator of richly encrusted happiness,” to borrow a phrase from F. Scott Fitzgerald. Large-souled and unfailingly generous, Steve has been an inspiration to me as a colleague and friend.

I also extend thanks to family members who have been interested in the progress of this work: Alexander, Liz, and Fay Bogel; Lee, Scott, Parker, and Brooks Bradway; and Jean and Julian Burroughs.

And lastly, I thank Rick Bogel—to whom this book is inscribed—for a journey of remarkable turns. To this extraordinarily perceptive and passionate person, I dedicate these pages—and much more.

-xii-

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