The Professor and the Profession

By Robert Bechtold Heilman | Go to book overview

10
Romance
Cymbeline

In Romeo and Juliet (ca. 1595) Romeo, believing that Juliet is dead, enters her tomb, takes poison there, and dies. Upon awaking and finding Romeo dead, Juliet stabs herself and dies. In Antony and Cleopatra (ca. 1607) Antony, believing that Cleopatra is dead, falls on his sword and thus brings about his death. In consequence, Cleopatra resolves on death by the poisonous bite of the asp. Compare these roughly similar situations with certain events in Cymbeline (ca. 1609– 1610). Imogen, recovering like Juliet from a drug that has brought about her apparent death, opens her eyes upon a corpse she believes to be her husband’s. But, though she faints, she neither takes her life nor thinks of doing so. When Posthumus receives apparent evidence of Imogen’s death, he too goes on living, though he has the added burden of remorse; true, he thinks of death, but only as a natural hazard of the war that he chooses to enter.

To be sure, different lovers have different personalities. But behind the variations of personality lie literary factors that influence the strikingly different outcomes of situations up to a point strikingly alike. Different conventions are at work: in Romeo and Antony, those of tragedy; in Cymbeline, those of dramatic romance. As it is used here, convention does not mean a formula, stereotype, or constricting rule, but rather a certain point of view, a way of perceiving human behavior, of understanding it and responding to it emotionally. A convention is a bond, though a flexible one, between playwright and audience; it involves a loose, unspoken agreement about attitude and procedure; it is rooted in shared expectations, though these may be unarticulated, general rather than specific, and open to great imaginative transformation by the artist. The tragic convention interprets life as a clash between, on the one hand, transcendent principles of order

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Professor and the Profession
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.