The Professor and the Profession

By Robert Bechtold Heilman | Go to book overview

20
Humanistic, Humane, Human

It is quite fashionable, today, to throw around such words as dehumanizing and humanizing in a variety of contexts. One of these contexts is education. After hearing the term humanizing education, and after listening in on some discussion of the theme, I began to feel that it might be worth a little investigation. What sounds like a slogan might have an unforeseen or unintended meaning.

“Humanizing” is like a maternity dress: it only partly conceals an inner burden—in this case, semantic triplets. As adjectives the three are human, humane, and humanistic; the corresponding nouns are human nature, humaneness or humanity, and humanities. By “humanizing,” then, do we mean getting more of human nature into education, making people more humane, or giving them more humanities? To start with the biggest word: the idea of a bigger serving of humanities on the curricular blue-plate does not make my pedagogical saliva flow faster. It is unseemly for anyone to plug for a bigger public intake of the particular entree that he is dishing out from the educational steam table. Some years ago, to describe the barking of their goods by humanists, I put forward the term humanisticism—a word sufficiently repellent to betray, amid the warm public air of uplift, the chill downdraft of profit. When the newspapers tell us almost daily of their selfless principled pursuit of everybody’s right to know, what reader does not think promptly of the papers’ basic quest for circulation and advertising? Desire to survive is understandable, but it should not be disguised as saintly public service.

There are subtler reasons for forgoing humanisticism. For one thing, if the humanistic documents do not seem vital to a society, promotion will not make them so. Public relations will not bring about a change of heart, prone as our age is to quickie rebirths. For another, my half century in universities persuades me that the quantity of humanities in curricular packaging is not likely to fall below a certain minimum. Further, the more humanities courses

-308-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Professor and the Profession
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.