Making "Pictures in Our Heads": Government Advertising in Canada

By Jonathan W. Rose | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

There are a number of people who have been helpful in seeing this project come to fruition. Academic debts are owed to E.R. Black with whom I spent many hours discussing the finer, and not so finer, points of government advertising. John Meisel, C.E.S. Franks, Robert Pike and Fred Fletcher offered very helpful suggestions at various stages of the book. Friends like Gerry Boychuk, Joseph Castagna, Craig Jones, Alan Kary, Hugh Mellon, Matthew Mendelsohn and Al Roberts have directly and indirectly stimulated my thoughts on this subject. I am grateful for the generosity of their help, advice and ideas.

Parts of the book have been presented at conferences. Chapters 4, 5, and 6, in one form or another, were presented in Pondicherry, India; Tampa, Florida and at annual meetings of the Canadian Political Science Association or the Canadian Communications Association in Victoria, BC; Calgary, Alberta and Kingston, Ontario. Thanks go to Queen’s University who has been generous in funding conference travel and research assistance through its Advisory Research Council. Al Roberts and I co-wrote an article in the Canadian Journal of Political Science based on chapter 6 and an early version of chapter 4 appeared in the Canadian Journal of Communication. I appreciate those journals allowing me to reproduce parts of published articles here.

The staff at the National Archives of Canada were very helpful in locating some of the historical data found in chapter 2 and made the archival part of the research a real joy. Caroline Forcier at the Audio-Visual Archives Division was great assistance in helping me find early government ads. Grant Heckman, Shirley Fraser and Valerie Janus have all been invaluable in making the text appear in a more presentable form.

-xv-

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