Making "Pictures in Our Heads": Government Advertising in Canada

By Jonathan W. Rose | Go to book overview

Conclusion: “A Kind of Decent
Materialism”?

The preceding chapters have attempted to show how the federal government in Canada has embraced advertising as a vital form of communication. While the government has often advertised, the scale has increased significantly in the last twenty years. The implications of this are manifold and significant for a democracy. If election advertising is any indication, we should be concerned that increasingly the public is getting its information about public policies from advertisements. If the news media tell us anything, it is that discussion of advertising is often a supplement for discussion of the issue being advertised. The strength of advertising both during elections and between elections by government is that it is able to distill complex images and ideas in neat, thirty-second sound bites. This could have serious implications for the way in which we discuss politics.

In his book on political marketing, Nicholas O’Shaughnessy argues that the problems with the reliance on advertising and marketing in the political process are threefold. First, it conveys a spurious idea of the ease with which advertising provides solutions; second, it creates a society resistant to change; and third, and possibly most alarming, it substitutes marketing methods for political leadership.1 To these we can add the replacement of party personnel with advertising and polling executives and the further marginalization of political parties in the electoral process.2

Writing in the last century, Alexis de Tocqueville observed that advertising in the United States amounted to “a kind of decent materialism.”3 With the possible exception of those in the advertising industry, few today would agree with Tocqueville’s characterization. Many writers both inside and outside advertising view the phenomenon of advertising as contributing to, if not creating, an insatiable demand for consumer goods

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making "Pictures in Our Heads": Government Advertising in Canada
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.