Procopius of Caesarea: Tyranny, History, and Philosophy at the End of Antiquity

By Anthony Kaldellis | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has been read at various stages by John Fine, Traianos Gagos, Ray Van Dam, Beate Dignas, Stephanos Efthymiadis, Dimitris Krallis, Kim Vogel, and Chris Lillington-Martin, all of whom I thank for their valuable suggestions. Dimitris was present at the creation on that gray day in November 1999 overlooking the Gulf of Corinth. Stephanos is probably the best philologist of Byzantine Greek I will ever know and has taught me much about the literary merits of Byzantine texts. Traianos and Ray I have thanked before and will no doubt do so again for the sound advice they have given me over the years on both personal and professional matters, as well as for sharing with me their expertise and insight. To John, who guided my first steps as a scholar, an overdue dedication. I could not have asked for an advisor more kind, generous with his time, or openminded.

I am also grateful to Eric Halpern of the University of Pennsylvania Press for his interest in my work and for seeing it through all stages of the publication process. The anonymous reader of the Press offered a model of constructive criticism that improved especially organization and presentation. I am also grateful to my own Department of Greek and Latin and College of Humanities at the Ohio State University, which have provided for the past two years a friendly and intellectually diverse environment in which to work and funds to assist with publication.

My greatest debt always remains to my parents.

-ix-

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Procopius of Caesarea: Tyranny, History, and Philosophy at the End of Antiquity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Classicism and Its DisContents 17
  • Chapter 2 - Tales Not Unworthy of Trust- Anecdotes and the Persian War 62
  • Chapter 3 - The Secret History of Philosophy 94
  • Chapter 4 - The Representation of Tyranny 118
  • Chapter 5 - God and Tyche in the Wars 165
  • Appendix 1 - Secret History 19–30 and the Edicts of Justinian 223
  • Appendix 2 - The Plan of Secret History 6–18 229
  • Abbreviations 231
  • Notes 233
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 299
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