Procopius of Caesarea: Tyranny, History, and Philosophy at the End of Antiquity

By Anthony Kaldellis | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Honoré (1978) 16.

2. Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, c. 40, 561, and 565. Seneca adulated Claudius in his letter To Polybius on Consolation and then ridiculed him in the Apocolocyntosis but wrote no history. He seems to have thought that historians are liars anyway (Natural Inquiries 4.3, 7.16).

3. Rudich (1993).

4. Wars 1.24.12, 7.31.9, for eleutherios; 5.3.5–9 for theology, with Secret History 18.29; ibid. 26.1–11 for decline of classical culture, and passim for persecutions.

5. Wars 6.15.8.

6. Wars 8.1.1; cf. Mi. Whitby (1992).

7. Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, c. 43, 731 n. 1.

8. Wars 1.1.4; for examples and an exception, see Kaldellis (1997).

9. Hornblower (1994) 131–134.

10. See Carroll (1990) and Lamarque and Olsen (1994) c. 8–9, and 301–310 for rigorous, lucid, and sane arguments.

11. These were discovered by Cornford (1907). A historicist, Cornford viewed them as influences exerted on Thucydides’ unconscious by pre-scientific elements of Greek civilization rather than fully conscious adaptations by the historian himself.

12. Miles (1995) for Livy; Syme (1958) for Tacitus.

13. E.g., Hartog (1988); Arieti (1995); cf. Romm (1998) 6–8, an introductory study. For Herodotus as fabricator, Fehling (1989), which elicited many responses, esp. Pritchett (1993) c. 2. Pritchett’s attack on Fehling is devastating, but that on Hartog in c. 4 is unfair and largely irrelevant. Hartog’s point is hardly that Herodotus “produced a fancy narrative which has no relation to the facts” (207).

14. Wars 1.4.17; see chapter 2, fourth section.

15. Aristotle, Poetics 9 (1451a39-b8); for a parallel defense of Herodotus, see Arieti (1995) 3.

16. Lamarque and Olsen (1994) 134: “Interpretation is a process of redescription, generalizing across elements in a work until the maximum number of elements have been subsumed under a higher-order description which articulates the theme of the work.” Cf. Nussbaum (1986) 69.

17. Griswold (1996) 9–16, 225.

18. E.g., Saxonhouse (1983) 142–145; Nussbaum (1986) 228–233; Strauss (1989) 99.

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Procopius of Caesarea: Tyranny, History, and Philosophy at the End of Antiquity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Classicism and Its DisContents 17
  • Chapter 2 - Tales Not Unworthy of Trust- Anecdotes and the Persian War 62
  • Chapter 3 - The Secret History of Philosophy 94
  • Chapter 4 - The Representation of Tyranny 118
  • Chapter 5 - God and Tyche in the Wars 165
  • Appendix 1 - Secret History 19–30 and the Edicts of Justinian 223
  • Appendix 2 - The Plan of Secret History 6–18 229
  • Abbreviations 231
  • Notes 233
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 299
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 305

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.