Procopius of Caesarea: Tyranny, History, and Philosophy at the End of Antiquity

By Anthony Kaldellis | Go to book overview

Index
People mentioned throughout the book (Procopius, Justinian, Romans, Greeks, Byzantines, Persians, barbarians, pagans, Christians, and heretics) are not included, nor are broad geographical names (Europe, Italy, Syria, etc.). References to modern scholars are not comprehensive and focus on discussions of Procopius as a writer.
Abandanes (Persian), 131–132
Abasgi, 131
Abydos, 181
Achilles, 22, 53
Achilles Tatius, 247
Adergoudounbades (Persian), 84–85, 128
Adshead, K., 34, 143, 238, 260–261, 263, 267, 272
Aelian, 245–246
Aeschylus, 260
Aetius (anthology), 274
Afinogenov, D., 40
Agapetus (deacon), 57, 114–115, 137–138, 256, 260
Agapetus (pope), 168
Agapius (philosopher), 134, 259
Agathias, 20, 26–27, 36, 37, 40, 53, 63, 65, 67, 73. 83, 93, 101–102, 106, 116–117, 213, 225, 235–237, 239, 240, 242–245, 248–252, 254– 257, 261, 264, 266, 269, 271–272
Ahl, F., 59, 236, 242, 264
Albani, 110
Alcibiades, 8
Alcuin of York, 215, 272
Alexander (logothetes), 52, 227, 240
Alexander of Aphrodisias, 268, 274
Alexander the Great, 77, 121, 136, 138, 241, 246, 260
Alexandria, 25, 36, 105, 218, 227
Amalasuntha, 95, 107–109, 113, 114, 130, 144– 145, 254
Amasis (Pharaoh), 245
Amazons, 149
Amida, 63, 98, 236
Ammatas (Vandal), 184
Ammianus Marcellinus, 44, 217, 234, 245, 249, 256, 269, 272–273
Amory, P., 254
Anastasius (emperor), 85, 98, 123, 135, 160, 226, 251, 259
Anatolius (general), 67–69, 243
Anaximenes of Lampsacus, 268
Anglo-Saxons, 4
Anna Komnene, 256
Anthemius (architect), 212
Antichrist, 155, 259
Antioch, 1, 42, 96, 121–122, 127–128, 167, 174, 176, 204–209, 216, 257, 258, 269–270. See also Theoupolis
Antonina, 79, 143–149, 164, 202, 246, 267
Apamea, 121–123, 126, 252
Aphthonius (rhetor), 76
Apis, 103
Apollo, 207, 236
Arabs/Saracens, 1, 204
Arcadius (emperor), 63, 65–67, 76, 85, 87, 95– 96, 98, 243
Archelaus (prefect), 181
Ardashir (Persian king), 244
Areobindus (governor), 162–163
Areobindus (young man), 78, 246
Arianism/Arians, 42, 166, 252
Aristides, Aelius, 244, 258
Aristophanes, 58–59, 116, 149, 242, 251, 261
Aristotle, 7, 149, 212, 219–220, 233, 244–246, 248, 250, 256, 261, 273–274
Armenians, 88–93, 131, 249, 262–263
Arrian, 77, 246, 259

-299-

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Procopius of Caesarea: Tyranny, History, and Philosophy at the End of Antiquity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Classicism and Its DisContents 17
  • Chapter 2 - Tales Not Unworthy of Trust- Anecdotes and the Persian War 62
  • Chapter 3 - The Secret History of Philosophy 94
  • Chapter 4 - The Representation of Tyranny 118
  • Chapter 5 - God and Tyche in the Wars 165
  • Appendix 1 - Secret History 19–30 and the Edicts of Justinian 223
  • Appendix 2 - The Plan of Secret History 6–18 229
  • Abbreviations 231
  • Notes 233
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 299
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