Faux Real: Genuine Leather and 200 Years of Inspired Fakes

By Robetr Kanigel | Go to book overview

8
Top Grain

A nondescript trade show hall in the exurbs beyond Boston’s outer beltway. Shoe retailers and shoe sales reps gather here for their twice-yearly show, talking up men’s tasseled slip-ons, stilettos and Mary Janes, chukkas, sandals, and funny-looking footwear only a clown could love. Volleyball shoes, orthopedic shoes, brogues, shoes fit for the dance floor or the nursing ward. Shoes stacked neatly on shelves, arranged clumsily on tables, piled in heaps on the floor. Shoes everywhere. And none are made of Corfam. Some older sales reps remember Corfam from their early years in the business but many have never heard of it. Today, cheaper shoes may have uppers made of vinyl or other man-made materials. And Franco Sarto has a slinky, calf-clinging women’s boot in black polyurethane that’s gotten buzz for being expensive, sexy, and synthetic—an uncommon combination. Hi-tech athletic shoes, for hiking, or running, or wrestling, use synthetic materials, too, just as the classic sneaker of half a century before did. But mostly, in men’s shoes or women’s, whether waterproofed, napped, shiny, glossy, matte, or suede, whether in drab brown, jet black, or iridescent purple, the predominant material here, 40 years after Corfam, is leather.

Back in 1964, Fortunes Lawrence Lessing concluded a rhapsodic paean to Corfam by asserting:

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Faux Real: Genuine Leather and 200 Years of Inspired Fakes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Part I - Imitating the Inimitable 1
  • 1 - Materid World 3
  • 2 - "Let the Good Work Go On" 24
  • 3 - Leather Alive 45
  • 4 - Bizarre Effects 69
  • 5 - One Nature 85
  • 6 - Nothing like Leather 95
  • 7 - "All Shortcomings Have Been Eliminated" 112
  • 8 - Top Grain 151
  • Part II - Inspired Fakes 171
  • 9 - What Nature Had in Mind 173
  • 10 - Crocodile Dreams 199
  • 11 - Vera Pelle 236
  • Sources and Acknowledgments 247
  • Index 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.