Shakespeare's Schoolroom: Rhetoric, Discipline, Emotion

By Lynn Enterline | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Imitate and Punish
The Theatricality of Everyday Life
in Elizabethan Schoolrooms

All that was to me a pleasure when I was a childe while I was undre my
father and mothers kepyng, be tornyde now to tormentes andpayn. For
than I was wont to lye sty lie abedde…. What sport it was to take my
lusty pleasur betwixte the shetes, to behold the rofe, the beamys…. But
nowe the worlde rennyth upon another whele. For nowe atfyve of the
clocke by the monelyght I most go to my booke and lete sleepe and slouthe
alon. Andyff oure maister hape to awake us, he bryngeth a rode stede
of a candle. Here is nought els preferryde but monyshynge and strypys

—Grammar school lesson for translation into Latin,

Ms. Arundel 249


Imitate and Punish

“Imitation is a principle that animates not only humanist stylistics but also humanist pedagogy.”1 Richard Halpern’s formulation succinctly captures two important strands of early modern thinking about the grammar school. First, as we began to see in the passage from Ascham’s Scholemaster, imitation structured the humanist approach to teaching both grammar and rhetoric. Perhaps contemporary satire best captures the ongoing tension, as well as the uneven development, that characterized “the grammarians’ war” over the benefits of teaching Latin through imitation as opposed to memorizing rules and

-33-

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Shakespeare's Schoolroom: Rhetoric, Discipline, Emotion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction - "Thou Art Translated" 1
  • Chapter 1 - Rhetoric and the Passions in Shakespeare’s Schoolroom 9
  • Chapter 2 - Imitate and Punish 33
  • Chapter 3 - The Art of Loving Mastery 62
  • Chapter 4 - The Cruelties of Character in the Taming of the Shrew 95
  • Chapter 5 - "What’s Hecuba to Him?" 120
  • Notes 153
  • Bibliogrdphy 183
  • Index 193
  • Acknowledgments 199
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