Shakespeare's Schoolroom: Rhetoric, Discipline, Emotion

By Lynn Enterline | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. For a reading of Freud’s evolving thought on the topic, see Jean Laplanche, “Fantasy and the Origins of Sexuality,” The International Journal of Psychoanalysis 49 (1968): 4.

2. My reading of Bottom’s translation is indebted to many long discussions with Jonathan Lamb as we developed our course on metamorphosis.

3. See Chapter 5 for a full discussion of this commonplace.

4. For a complete discussion of Cicero’s distinction between “divisio” and “partitio” as well as Shakespeare’s knowledge of it, see T.W. Baldwin, Shakspere’s Small Latine & Lesse Greeke (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1944) 2:111-112.

5. See Chapters 3 and 5 especially, where I outline the habits of personification and impersonation that were engrained in school lessons in grammar and rhetoric.

6. I rely here on the apt formulation of Diana Fuss in Identification Papers: Readings on Psychoanalysis, Sexuality, and Culture (New York: Routledge, 1995).


CHAPTER I

1. Since the records of the King’s Free Grammar School in Stratford do not survive, and several recent studies suggest the important influence that a number of London schools had on provincial ones, I draw widely from many school archives and attend to several kinds of evidence from the boys rather than the masters: the exercises, books, and poems written for or by boys at school; which texts and practices appear to have been most widespread; and the rhetorical techniques that find clear reflection in the writing of former grammar schoolboys. The two most important recent summaries of what Shakespeare most likely read at school are Leonard Barkan, “What Did Shakespeare Read?” in The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare, ed. Margreta de Grazia and Stanley Wells (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), 31—45; and Colin Burrow, “Shakespeare and Humanistic Culture” in Shakespeare and the Classics, ed. Charles Martindale and A. B. Taylor (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), 9-27.

2. Kent Cartwright, Theater and Humanism: English Drama and the Sixteenth Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999).

-153-

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Shakespeare's Schoolroom: Rhetoric, Discipline, Emotion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction - "Thou Art Translated" 1
  • Chapter 1 - Rhetoric and the Passions in Shakespeare’s Schoolroom 9
  • Chapter 2 - Imitate and Punish 33
  • Chapter 3 - The Art of Loving Mastery 62
  • Chapter 4 - The Cruelties of Character in the Taming of the Shrew 95
  • Chapter 5 - "What’s Hecuba to Him?" 120
  • Notes 153
  • Bibliogrdphy 183
  • Index 193
  • Acknowledgments 199
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