Varieties of Sovereignty and Citizenship

By Sigal R. Ben-Porath; Rogers M. Smith | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
World Government Is Here!

ROBERT E. GOODIN


Diagnostics: Why So Scary?

World government has long been the great bogeyman of international political theorizing. It spooked Immanuel Kant. At one point in his essay Perpetual Peace he speaks of it as a “soulless despotism” that would threaten to “choke the seeds of good.”1 It has similarly spooked generations of writers ever since. But what is it exactly about world government that people find so scary?

Maybe what people fear is how it might come about. Suppose, for example, that the only possible way world government could arise would be by some expansionist imperial power swallowing up all in its wake.2 That would be pretty scary. Ditto if a bloody world revolution were the only way to get there.3

World government would be scary if those were the only ways to get there—which, of course, they are not. Neo-Hegelians point to other perfectly coherent pathways, via the dynamics of recognition.4 Neo-functionalists point to routes whereby the European Coal and Steel Community turned into the European Economic Community (EEC) and then into the European Union (EU). In this neo-functionalist scenario, states would just cede ever-increasing power over functionally demarcated areas to some suprastate entity that is demonstrably capable of coordinating them more effectively, with those multiple overlapping functional jurisdictions eventually forming a consolidated world government.5 Neo-liberals trace ways in which occasional crises lead to an expansion of the range of people to whom power

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Varieties of Sovereignty and Citizenship
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 339

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.