Ending Slavery: How We Free Today's Slaves

By Kevin Bales | Go to book overview

Notes

1. THE CHALLENGE: UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD OF NEW SLAVERY

1. Quotations from Rose were gathered in interviews for the film Slavery: A Global Investigation, Truevision Productions, London, 2001.

2. “Sally” didn’t want her real name to be used. I have changed the names of all the people, enslaved or freed, whom I interviewed for this book, with the exception of those people whose stories have already been publicized, activists and abolitionists with public roles, and public officials. The safety of some antislavery workers and freed slaves depends on their anonymity. Those still enslaved are under enough threat without my adding to it.

3. The information on the outcomes of the trials was gathered in interviews for the film Dreams Die Hard, Free the Slaves, Washington, D.C., 2005.

4. The U.S. Department of State estimates that around 17,500 people are trafficked into the United States each year. We know from work done by Free the Slaves and the Human Rights Center, University of California, Berkeley, that the average period that trafficking victims are enslaved in the United States is between three and five years. For more on slavery in the United States, see Free the Slaves and Human Rights Center, University of California, Berkeley, Hidden Slaves: Forced Labor in the United States, 2004, available at http://freetheslaves.net/files/Hidden_Slaves.pdf; or at “Hidden Slaves: Forced Labor in the United States,” Berkeley journal of International Law 23, no. 1 (2005): 47–111.

5. For an explanation of the estimate that there are about twenty-seven million slaves in the world, see Kevin Bales, Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999); or “International Labor Standards: Quality of Information and Measures of Progress in Combating Forced Labor,” Comparative Labor Law and Policy 24, no. 2 (Winter 2004).

6. A slave in India costs less than 1 percent of the price of a productive field, or about 10–15 percent of the annual wages of a farm laborer (one of the lowest-paid workers in India), and around 17 percent of the price of an ox. In the

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