History Derailed: Central and Eastern Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century

By Ivan T. Berend | Go to book overview
3.Uprisings and Reforms: The Struggle for Independence and Modernization89
 The Western Challenge and Eastern Westernizers / 89 / The Polish Uprisings / 92 / From Revolt to “Organic Work” / 99 / The Peaceful Czech National Movement / 102 / The “Age of Reforms” and the Hungarian Revolution / 105 / National Minorities and the Hungarian Revolution / 111 / From the Brotherhood of Nations to Exclusive, Hostile Nationalism / 114 / From Religious to National Consciousness in the Balkans / 119 / 
4.Economic Modernization in the Half Century before World War I134
 The Impact of Western Industrialization / 134 / The Immigration of Western Entrepreneurs and Skilled Workers / 135 / The Internationalization of the European Economy / 136 / Core-Periphery Relations and Economic Nationalism in the Making / 139 / The Early Industrialization of Austria and the Czech Lands / 142 / Railroads and Banks: Modernization with Foreign Investments / 151 / The Belated Agricultural Revolution / 158 / The Export Sectors and Their Spin-off Effect / 167 / Regional Differences / 178 / 
5.Social Changes: “Dual” and “Incomplete” Societies181
 Industrialization and Social Restructuring in the West / 181 / The Dual Society: The Survival of the Noble Elite / 184 / Dual Societies: The Emergence of a New Elite / 196 / The “Jewish Question” / 199 / Incomplete Societies / 204 / The Lower Layers of Dual and Incomplete Societies: Peasants and Workers / 206 / The Demographic Revolution / 215 / Family and Gender Relations / 221 / The Growth of Towns and Cities / 228 / 
6.The Political System: Democratization versus Authoritarian Nationalism235
 The Political Legacy of Autocratic Rule / 236 / Ottoman Autocracy and Balkan Authoritarianism / 240 / The “National Mission” of Expansion to Unite the Nation / 247 / Russian Autocracy and Polish Nationalism / 253 / Habsburg Authoritarianism and Czech Nationalism / 258 / Hungarian Nationalism / 264 / The Seeds of Revolt / 273 / 
Epilogue: World War I285
Bibliography291
Index313

-vi-

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