Islam after Communism: Religion and Politics in Central Asia

By Adeeb Khalid | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book marks a departure from my usual research interests, which my historian’s instinct have kept focused on the early twentieth century. My turn to the current topic was dictated by world events. After September 11, Central Asia, perhaps one of the least-known regions of the world, found itself in the global limelight. I saw a need for a broad, accessible treatment of Islam in cotemporary Central Asia and put aside my other projects to write this book. This book was therefore written without the usual preliminaries of grant proposals and leaves from teaching, and thus owes more than usual to the help, advice, encouragement, support, and good humor of friends and colleagues.

Many individuals and groups heard excerpts from this book, but I owe a particular debt to Sergei Abashin, Laura Adams, Stéphane Dudoignon, Adrienne Edgar, Marianne Kamp, Shoshana Keller, and Russell Zanca, who shared their insights and their own research with me. Grants from the National Council on Eurasian and Eastern European Research and Carleton College allowed a trip to the region in summer 2004. Many thanks for hospitality and guidance to Franz Wennberg and Muzaffar Olimov in Dushanbe and to Nurbulat Masanov in Almaty. I owe a great deal to many friends and acquaintances in Uzbekistan, who over the years have taught me a lot about Central Asia, but I think it prudent to leave them unnamed here.

I marvel at the luck that brought Shahzad Bashir to the small college where I teach and made him a colleague and a friend. In addition to pro-

-xi-

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Islam after Communism: Religion and Politics in Central Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Islam in Central Asia 19
  • Chapter 2 - Empire and the Challenge of Modernity 34
  • Chapter 3 - The Soviet Assault on Islam 50
  • Chapter 4 - Islam as National Heritage 84
  • Chapter 5 - The Revival of Islam 116
  • Chapter 6 - Islam in Opposition 140
  • Chapter 7 - The Politics of Antiterrorism 168
  • Conclusion - Andijan and beyond 192
  • Afterword 204
  • Glossary 211
  • Notes 213
  • Select Bibliography 235
  • Index 243
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