Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon

By Kathryn Lofton | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Every writer has an imagined audience. For me, this audience is four people who disciplined my thinking from there to here. Catherine Brekus, Laurie Maffly-Kipp, Jonathan Smith, and Thomas Tweed define a set of problems that have become in my work the ones worth solving. Not because they can be solved, but because the process of their solution is the very thing that defines our professional obligation.

There have been many readers for this book, first and foremost my departmental homes, including the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Department of Religion at Reed College, the Department of Religious Studies and Program in American Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and the Department of Religious Studies and Program in American Studies at Yale University. Papers related to this project were presented at annual meetings of the American Academy of Religion and the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, as well as before audiences at Baylor University, Hofstra University, Manhattan College, North Carolina State University, the University of Rochester, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Toronto, and the University of Utah. Finally, I received support during my research and writing through the History of American Christian Practice Project, the Young Scholars in American Religion Program (both funded by the Lilly Endowment), and the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University, where I received

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