Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon

By Kathryn Lofton | Go to book overview

Index
A&E Biography (TV series), 146–47
abortion, 217
Ackerman, Diane, 167
“Acres of Diamonds” (sermon; Conwell), 45–46
Adorno, Theodor, 14
Adult Bible Class movement, 180–81
advertising, 33–35
advisers. See financial counselors; spiritual
advisers/counselors
advocacies, 24–25
affluenza, 210, 271n14
Africa: “back to Africa” colonization efforts, 190, 198; packaging of, for American audiences, 200–202; Protestant missionaries in, 198. See also South Africa
African American Christianity, 52, 129–32, 192
African Americans: activism of, 192; “back to Africa” colonization efforts, 190, 198; as naturally religious, 253n51
African American women: dual “otherness” of, 126; as icons, 142–45, 252n27; Mammy stereotype, 131, 253–54n55; missionary work of, 192; as preachers, 131–32, 134–35
African Methodist Episcopal Church, 132
African National Congress, 201
Age of Oprah, The (Peck), 224–25n10
“aha moments”: in Book Club discussions, 185–86; in confessions, 90–92, 108–9; lawsuit over use of term, 244n17; Oprah and failure to elicit, 114; spirituality and, 54
“ahh moments,” 105
Albanese, Catherine, 59
Allende, Isabel, 162
Allison, Dorothy, 91
Amanda Smith Industrial School for Girls, 134
Amarillo (Tex.), 3
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM), 197
American Buddhism, 134, 250n9
American Dream, 46, 162–63
American Girl Place (Chicago, Ill.), 39–41
American Idol (TV program), 206
American religion: globalization of, 191; missionaries in, 191; modern holy men in, 67; pleas for national unity in, 121– 22; secularism and, 12–13; Sixties political radicalism and, 51; therapeutic bent of, 237n9; women preachers in, 132–33. See also evangelicalism; Protestantism; specific religion
American Unitarianism, 134
Angelica, Mother, 137
Angel Network, 5, 38, 193–94
Angelou, Maya, 128
Angelus Temple (Los Angeles, Calif.), 136
Anna Karenina (Tolstoy), 168, 180
Anshaw, Carol, 154–55

-275-

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