The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today

By Kevin Bales; Ron Soodalter | Go to book overview

PREFACE TO THE PAPERBACK EDITION

Since we sat down to write The Slave Next Door, there have been some significant developments; and while many areas are still in serious need of improvement, a number of things have changed for the better. First, let’s look at the good news.


POSITIVE DEVELOPMENTS

New Administration, Fresh Outlook

From all outward signs, the election of Barack Obama to the presidency has brought a fresh outlook to the issue of human trafficking and slavery in our country. This “debasement of our common humanity,” he stated, “has to be a top priority.” And Secretary of State Hillary Clinton echoed these sentiments. In a June 17, 2009, op-ed in the Washington Post, timed to accompany the release of the annual Trafficking in Persons Report, she wrote, “The Obama administration views the fight against human trafficking, at home and abroad, as an important priority on our foreign policy agenda.” It’s still too early to tell, but thus far, the new administration is saying and doing all the right things. In a move that demonstrated an understanding of the problem and how best to address it, President Obama nominated Luis CdeBaca as the State Department’s ambassador-at-large to monitor and combat trafficking in persons. CdeBaca, arguably one of the most qualified people in America for the post, brings a career-long history of fighting human trafficking cases as

Counsel to the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, on detail from the
Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. On the Commit-
tee, his portfolio for Chairman John Conyers, Jr. includes national security,
intelligence, immigration, civil rights, and modern slavery issues. At the
Justice Department, CdeBaca served as Chief Counsel of the Civil Rights
Division’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit. During the Clinton Admin-

-vii-

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The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition vii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Part I - Slaves in the Land of the Free 1
  • 1 - The Old Slavery and the New 3
  • 2 - House Slaves 18
  • 3 - Slaves in the Pastures of Plenty 43
  • 4 - Supply and Demand 78
  • 5 - New Business Models 117
  • 6 - Eating, Wearing, Walking, and Talking Slavery 137
  • Part II - The Final Emancipation 161
  • 7 - Slaves in the Neighborhood 163
  • 8 - States of Confusion 195
  • 9 - The Feds 211
  • 10 - A Future without Slavery 251
  • Appendix - For Further Information 269
  • Notes 277
  • Index 301
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