The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today

By Kevin Bales; Ron Soodalter | Go to book overview

7
SLAVES IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD
Slavery has been identified in over one hundred of our cities; the real number is undoubtedly much higher. When we hear about slavery in our midst, the tendency is to think, “Not in my town.” In a way, we consider ourselves above it, especially if we live in comfortable, relatively trouble-free communities. The harsh truth is, modern-day slavery is in your town. You are not protected from it by nationality, race, gender, or income. It can afflict anyone—the gardener down the street, the construction crew on a local office building, your neighbor’s housekeeper, your daughter on her way to the mall. Americans are going to have to adjust to the fact that people are enslaved all around us and that the solution to this problem lies, in large measure, within ourselves.
KNOWING IT WHEN WE SEE IT
The message is clear: if you spot a trafficking victim, you should say or do something. It sounds simple; it’s anything but. The hard part isn’t taking action; it’s knowing slavery when you see it. Slavery in America tends to be hidden. Chances are, you could be staring full on at a human trafficking situation and not recognize it. Guidelines are clearly needed. The Washington, D.C.–based NGO Free the Slaves has printed and distributed a handbook entitled “Slavery Still Exists and It Could Be in Your Backyard: A Community Member’s Guide to Fighting Human Trafficking and Slavery (available at www.freetheslaves.net). In it, they offer a list of things to look for, pointing out that the trafficked person “might be a domestic worker, work in a restaurant, on a farm, in a shop, in a factory, or as a prostitute.” The worker “is likely to be enslaved if he or she:
Is working or being held against his or her will
Is not free to change employers

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition vii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Part I - Slaves in the Land of the Free 1
  • 1 - The Old Slavery and the New 3
  • 2 - House Slaves 18
  • 3 - Slaves in the Pastures of Plenty 43
  • 4 - Supply and Demand 78
  • 5 - New Business Models 117
  • 6 - Eating, Wearing, Walking, and Talking Slavery 137
  • Part II - The Final Emancipation 161
  • 7 - Slaves in the Neighborhood 163
  • 8 - States of Confusion 195
  • 9 - The Feds 211
  • 10 - A Future without Slavery 251
  • Appendix - For Further Information 269
  • Notes 277
  • Index 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.