The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today

By Kevin Bales; Ron Soodalter | Go to book overview

9
THE FEDS

It is important to look at the federal government’s actions—both positive and negative—in its relatively new war against human trafficking in America. Many federal officials have taken on the task of rooting out and prosecuting traffickers, as well as coordinating with service providers and victim advocates providing care for survivors. We’ll speak with representatives of some of the federal agencies whose job description has been expanded to include modern-day slavery and get a sense of how they feel the campaign is going. We’ll also examine some cases that seem to stand in direct contradiction to the antitrafficking position taken by the government—cases in which administration politics and inaction have actually increased human trafficking on American soil—both here and abroad. One of the worst of these cases involves taxpayer money supporting slavery as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom.


BRINGING DEMOCRACY TO IRAQ—ON THE BACKS
OF SLAVES

First Kuwaiti General Trade and Contracting Co., a billion-dollar construction company, was hired to build the new U.S. Embassy in Baghdad—after no American company would agree to the government’s terms.1 The project is worth $592 million to First Kuwaiti and encompasses a 104-acre, twenty-one-building complex, making it the largest U.S. embassy in the world. When completed, it will be six times larger than the United Nations and the same size as Vatican City.2 From the beginning First Kuwaiti had difficulty in fulfilling the terms of its contract. Serious problems piled up: faulty wiring, fuel leaks, and poor construction. Some of the problems were determined to be “life safety issues.” And while the day-to-day firefight was going on in Baghdad, a war of words was being waged between the State

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The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition vii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Part I - Slaves in the Land of the Free 1
  • 1 - The Old Slavery and the New 3
  • 2 - House Slaves 18
  • 3 - Slaves in the Pastures of Plenty 43
  • 4 - Supply and Demand 78
  • 5 - New Business Models 117
  • 6 - Eating, Wearing, Walking, and Talking Slavery 137
  • Part II - The Final Emancipation 161
  • 7 - Slaves in the Neighborhood 163
  • 8 - States of Confusion 195
  • 9 - The Feds 211
  • 10 - A Future without Slavery 251
  • Appendix - For Further Information 269
  • Notes 277
  • Index 301
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