The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today

By Kevin Bales; Ron Soodalter | Go to book overview

10
A FUTURE WITHOUT SLAVERY

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are
created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are
Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776

All persons held as slaves… shall be then,
thenceforward, and forever free.
Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863

The last time America brought slavery to an end, the price was high. Over six hundred thousand Americans died in our Civil War—more than the total loss of American life in all our other wars combined. Not every Union or Confederate soldier was fighting to end or preserve the institution of slavery, but make no mistake: slavery was the spark that ignited the war. After the war the emancipation of four million Americans, promised by the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, was badly handled and incomplete. The government’s failure to offer freed slaves the full rights of citizenship was a mistake that America is still paying for today. Legal slavery in America ended in 1865, but slavery continued, pernicious, hidden, and cruel. There has been slavery in America from the moment of the country’s birth; and just as it has been America’s greatest burden, the true eradication of slavery could be America’s greatest triumph. Ending slavery in America would also be a victory for all humanity, for slavery has dogged our steps from the beginning of history. Nothing shows this better than the interweaving of slavery into the tapestry of civilization.


A WORLD OF SLAVES

Walk through the cool marble halls of the world’s great museums: the Smithsonian, the British Museum, the Louvre. The lofty ceilings and enormous galleries make them more than a little awe-inspiring, and an automatic hush often falls on those who grasp what they are seeing. The honey-colored columns and the tall marbled-walled rooms contain the

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The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition vii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Part I - Slaves in the Land of the Free 1
  • 1 - The Old Slavery and the New 3
  • 2 - House Slaves 18
  • 3 - Slaves in the Pastures of Plenty 43
  • 4 - Supply and Demand 78
  • 5 - New Business Models 117
  • 6 - Eating, Wearing, Walking, and Talking Slavery 137
  • Part II - The Final Emancipation 161
  • 7 - Slaves in the Neighborhood 163
  • 8 - States of Confusion 195
  • 9 - The Feds 211
  • 10 - A Future without Slavery 251
  • Appendix - For Further Information 269
  • Notes 277
  • Index 301
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