The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today

By Kevin Bales; Ron Soodalter | Go to book overview

NOTES

1. THE OLD SLAVERY AND THE NEW
1. “Girl Reunited with Parents,” Laredo Morning Times, May 17, 2001.
2. “Woman Sentenced to Life in Prison for Torturing 12-Year-Old Maid,” Amarillo Globe News, October 20, 2001.
3. U.S. Department of State, Trafficking in Persons Report, June 2006, www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2006/.
4. U.S. Department of Justice, Attorney General’s Annual Report to Congress on U.S. Government Activities to Combat Trafficking in Persons for Fiscal Year 2006, May 2007, www.usdoj.gov/olp/human_trafficking.htm, 17. Other cases were brought by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
5. Only one man in U.S. history, a Portland, Maine, sea captain named Nathaniel Gordon, was ever hanged as a slaver, despite the fact that slave trading— sailing to Africa, loading your hold with captives, and selling them in America, Cuba, or Brazil—had been made a capital offense by the Piracy Act of 1820. Thousands of slave ships sailed to Africa with impunity, as the government and the navy looked the other way, and the courts did practically nothing to enforce the slave trade laws. Not until the election of Abraham Lincoln and the advent of the Civil War was an attempt made to exact the death penalty for this crime that had led directly to the deaths of millions. For the complete story, see Ron Soodalter, Hanging Captain Gordon: The Life and Trial of an American Slave Trader (New York: Atria, 2006).
6. Jacqueline Jones, The Dispossessed: America’s Underclasses from the Civil War to the Present (New York: Basic Books, 1992), 107.
7. Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, “Case Study,” available from LIRS, 700 Light St., Baltimore, MD 21230.
8. Slavery is a patterned relationship that achieves exploitative ends including appropriation of labor for productive activities resulting in economic gain, use of the enslaved person as an item of conspicuous consumption, sexual use of an enslaved person for pleasure and procreation, and the savings gained when paid servants or workers are replaced with unpaid and unfree workers. Any particular slave may fulfill one, several, or all of these outcomes for the slaveholder. Slavery is a relationship between two people. It is both a social and economic relationship, and like all relationships it has certain characteristics and rules. The key characteristics of slavery are not about ownership but about how people are controlled. The core characteristic of slavery throughout history, whether it was

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The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition vii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Part I - Slaves in the Land of the Free 1
  • 1 - The Old Slavery and the New 3
  • 2 - House Slaves 18
  • 3 - Slaves in the Pastures of Plenty 43
  • 4 - Supply and Demand 78
  • 5 - New Business Models 117
  • 6 - Eating, Wearing, Walking, and Talking Slavery 137
  • Part II - The Final Emancipation 161
  • 7 - Slaves in the Neighborhood 163
  • 8 - States of Confusion 195
  • 9 - The Feds 211
  • 10 - A Future without Slavery 251
  • Appendix - For Further Information 269
  • Notes 277
  • Index 301
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