The Failure of Environmental Education (and How We Can Fix It)

By Charles Saylan; Daniel T. Blumstein | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
The Problem(s)

Environmental education has failed to bring about the changes in attitude and behavior necessary to stave off the detrimental effects of climate change, biodiversity loss, and environmental degradation that our planet is experiencing at an alarmingly accelerating rate.

For decades, scientists have warned of the potentially devastating consequences of climate change, and although it has become a highly politicized issue, serious problems still loom in earth’s near future. A conservative approach would dictate that our societies act expediently to mitigate these potential threats. But that is not happening. Instead, we are all paralyzed by indecision, argument, misplaced politicization of the issues, and a widespread lack of commitment to change. The pace of environmental degradation, however, is not slowing.

This collective inability to act is brought about in part by educational institutions that generally do not provide the tools necessary for critical thinking and for understanding the

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The Failure of Environmental Education (and How We Can Fix It)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One - The Problem(S) 1
  • Chapter Two - Foundations 21
  • Chapter Three - What Went Wrong 38
  • Chapter Four - Accountability and Institutional Mind-Set 57
  • Chapter Five - The Needs of Environmentally Active Citizens 72
  • Chapter Six - Between Awareness and Action 95
  • Chapter Seven - A Political Primer 116
  • Chapter Eight - Consumption, Conservation, and Change 135
  • Chapter Nine - An Evolving Metric 158
  • Chapter Ten - And How We Can Fix It 173
  • Appendix - Greening Schools for Alternative Education 199
  • Notes 203
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Acknowledgments 225
  • Index 229
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