Shanghai Splendor: Economic Sentiments and the Making of Modern China, 1843-1949

By Wen-Hsin Yeh | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This study has been long in the making. From a simple curiosity about the Shanghai urbanites in their myriad walks of life, this research has evolved into a focused study of the aspirations and frustrations of the literate workers at their desks, and the convergence of circumstances that brought them out of the buildings and into the streets. With the recent emergence of Shanghai as a global destination, the voices of these urbanites have further inspired reflection on the relevance of history in the transformation of space.

Numerous individuals and organizations have contributed to the making of this project. A judicious acknowledgment would have amounted to a massive listing of much of the academia. I wish to acknowledge nonetheless the generous support of the Committee on Scholarly Communications with China, the Luce Foundation, the Hoover Institution, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchanges, the President’s Office of the University of California, and, on the Berkeley campus, the Chancellor’s Office, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Center for Chinese Studies, the France-Berkeley Fund, and the Committee on Research for fellowships and awards.

Earlier versions of aspects of this project have been presented at scores of workshops, seminars, and conferences. I wish to acknowledge in particular the stimulation and exchanges with colleagues and students who took part in the Shanghai Studies projects funded by the Luce Foundation at the University of California at Berkeley, Cornell University, Uni

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shanghai Splendor: Economic Sentiments and the Making of Modern China, 1843-1949
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Material Turn 9
  • Chapter 2 - The State in Commerce 30
  • Chapter 3 - Visual Politics and Shanghai Glamour 51
  • Chapter 4 - The Clock and the Compound 79
  • Chapter 5 - Enlightened Paternalism 101
  • Chapter 6 - Petty Urbanites and Tales of Woe 129
  • Chapter 7 - From Patriarchs to Capitalists 152
  • Epilogue - The Return of the Banker 205
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 259
  • Glossary 285
  • Index 293
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.