Shanghai Splendor: Economic Sentiments and the Making of Modern China, 1843-1949

By Wen-Hsin Yeh | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. Wen-hsin Yeh, “Republican Origins of the Danwei: The Case of Shanghai’s Bank of China,” in Danwei: The Changing Chinese Workplace in Historieal and Comparative Perspective, ed. Xiaobo Lu & Elizabeth J. Perry, (Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1997), 60–88.

2. See chapter 3.

3. Raymond Williams defines these issues in The Country and the City (New York: Oxford University Press, 1975).

4. Frederic E. Wakeman, Jr., “China and the Seventeenth Century Crisis,” Late Imperial China 7, no. 1 (June 1986): 1–23.

5. Frederic E. Wakeman, Jr., “The Canton Trade and the Opium War,” in The Cambridge History of China vol. 10, pt. 1, Late Ch’ing, 1800–1911, ed. Denis Twichett and John K. Fairbank, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1978), 163–212; Jonathan Spence, “Opium Smoking in Ch’ing China,” in Conflict and Control, ed. Wakeman and Carolyn Grant, 143–73; Lin Man-houng, China Upside Down: Currency, Society, and Ideologies, 1808–1856 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006).

6. James Hevia, Cherishing Men From Afar: Qing Guest Ritual and the Macartney Embassy of 1793 (Durham: Duke University Press, 1995); Timothy Brook and Robert Tadashi Wakabayashi, eds., Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan, 1839–1952 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000).

7. Marketing strategies, business networks, migration patterns, and the flow of images and information characteristically cut across national borders, political divisions, ideological rivalries, formal regulations legislated by various states, and so forth. See Sherman Cochran, Big Business in China: Sino-Foreign Rivalry in the Cigarette Industry (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980), Encountering Chinese Networks: Western, Japanese, and Chinese Corporations in

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Shanghai Splendor: Economic Sentiments and the Making of Modern China, 1843-1949
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Material Turn 9
  • Chapter 2 - The State in Commerce 30
  • Chapter 3 - Visual Politics and Shanghai Glamour 51
  • Chapter 4 - The Clock and the Compound 79
  • Chapter 5 - Enlightened Paternalism 101
  • Chapter 6 - Petty Urbanites and Tales of Woe 129
  • Chapter 7 - From Patriarchs to Capitalists 152
  • Epilogue - The Return of the Banker 205
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 259
  • Glossary 285
  • Index 293
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