The Stickup Kids: Race, Drugs, Violence, and the American Dream

By Randol Contrems | Go to book overview

SEVEN
Gettin’ the Shit

AROUND 5:30 A.M. A PITCH-DARK apartment in the South Bronx.

Gus and David, each with a gun, wait silently on either side of the apartment door. Several moments later, the building’s hallway light shines through as the door opens from outside. Melissa and the dealer enter, shutting the door behind them. It is dark again. Gus suddenly smacks the dealer across the neck, grabs him with both hands, and pulls him down to the floor.

“Yo, don’t move, moth erfuck at” Gus says, angrily.

“Que lo quepasa? [What’s happening?]” asks the bewildered dealer.

As David holds a gun to the dealer’s head, Gus blindfolds the dealer and binds his arms and legs with a metal hanger wire. Together, Gus and David then drag the dealer farther into the hallway, away from the door. Gus pulls a knife from his pants pocket.

“Look, I’ma ask you what you do and dependin’ on the answer you give me, depends what happens to you,” Gus tells the dealer. “I’ma ask you what you got on 145th Street. Tell me what it is and nothing’s gonna happen to you. If you don’t tell me, I’ma cut your ear off. You understand the shit?”

“Yes, I understand,” replies the dealer.

“A’ight. What you got on 145th Street and Broadway?”

“What are you talkin’ about? I don’t got nothin’ there.”

“On the fifth floor, on 145th Street and Broadway, what you got in the room?”

“I don’t have nothin’. I work for a store. That’s all I do.”

Gus grabs the dealer’s ear and slices off the lobe. Blood spurts. To keep the blood from flowing onto the floor, Gus and David drag the dealer to the bathtub. The torture has begun.

-136-

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The Stickup Kids: Race, Drugs, Violence, and the American Dream
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Stickup Kids - Race, Drugs, Violence, and the American Dream iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations (after Page 11 4) ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Becoming Stickup Kids 33
  • One - The Rise of the South Bronx and Crack 35
  • Two - Crack Days- Getting Paid 56
  • Three - Rikers Island- Normalizing Violence 72
  • Four - The New York Boys- Tail Enders of the Crack Era 87
  • Five - Crack Is Dead 105
  • Part Two - Doing the Stickup 115
  • Six - The Girl 117
  • Seven - Gettin’ The Shit 136
  • Eight - Drug Robbery Torture 151
  • Nine - Splitting the Profits 176
  • Ten - Living the Dream- Life after a Drug Robbery 191
  • Part Three - Todo Tiene Su Final 203
  • Eleven - Fallen Stars 205
  • Conclusion 235
  • Notes 243
  • Index 267
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