The Stickup Kids: Race, Drugs, Violence, and the American Dream

By Randol Contrems | Go to book overview

TEN
Living the Dream
LIFE AFTER A DRUG ROBBERY

AFTER GETTING HIS SHARE, Gus drove back to his uncle’s apartment, where he was staying. He weighed the stashed drugs on his scale. Two hundred grams. Sixteen thousand dollars. Yo! But not so fast. Gus needed to find buyers, which wasn’t so easy. For help, he told Julio about the hidden drugs and offered him half the earnings for whatever he sold. Julio agreed. Now both searched for dealers willing to buy large amounts of drugs.

The cocaine found a quick buyer, a small-time dealer agreeing to buy it at twenty dollars a gram. However, the dealer did not pay cash up front. It was a consignment arrangement where Gus and Julio had to wait for its sale in Massachusetts before seeing profit.

“I gave it to this kid to sell so that he could sell it to somebody else,” Gus explained. “But I don’t see no profit until he sells that shit. Like the nigga has to sell it, get his profit, and then after all of that, I see my money.”

Their other option involved higher risk and more time: cutting the cocaine into single-gram packets, then selling them on the street for several months. But Gus and Julio wanted their cash fast, within the week. Fortunately, the dealer returned three days later, with thirty-eight hundred dollars.

Now the heroin. Gus and Julio contacted several dope dealers and gave them free samples. However, the trial users said it was “no good.” Gus was deflated. After seeing him sulk for several weeks, I asked him about the dope. “I thought I was gonna see some real money off this shit,” Gus explained. “Now nobody wants it. Yo, I can’t even give this shit away to people. I gotta trick somebody into buyin’ this shit. But then they might see that the dope is no good and then they come back. And I gotta be like, ‘Fuck it, you bought it, that’s it.’”

-191-

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The Stickup Kids: Race, Drugs, Violence, and the American Dream
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Stickup Kids - Race, Drugs, Violence, and the American Dream iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations (after Page 11 4) ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Becoming Stickup Kids 33
  • One - The Rise of the South Bronx and Crack 35
  • Two - Crack Days- Getting Paid 56
  • Three - Rikers Island- Normalizing Violence 72
  • Four - The New York Boys- Tail Enders of the Crack Era 87
  • Five - Crack Is Dead 105
  • Part Two - Doing the Stickup 115
  • Six - The Girl 117
  • Seven - Gettin’ The Shit 136
  • Eight - Drug Robbery Torture 151
  • Nine - Splitting the Profits 176
  • Ten - Living the Dream- Life after a Drug Robbery 191
  • Part Three - Todo Tiene Su Final 203
  • Eleven - Fallen Stars 205
  • Conclusion 235
  • Notes 243
  • Index 267
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