Unimagined Community: Sex, Networks, and AIDS in Uganda and South Africa

By Robert J. Thornton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
The Tightening Chain
Civil Society and Uganda’s Response
to HIV / AIDS

No one could see the link forming and stretching across the
country, a tightening chain that bound everybody together.

Doreen Baingana, Ugandan novelist, 2005


SYSTEM SYNERGIES

Uganda’s approach converted the moralism of the ABC prevention model (abstinence, being faithful, and using condoms) to the social ethic of “zero grazing.” This allowed for the mobilization of civil society, and for the prevention of AIDS to be treated as a nation-building exercise. The synergies brought about by a comprehensive and integrated response by government and civil society were largely responsible for the change in HIV prevalence.

It first became apparent in 1996 that HIV prevalence in Uganda, alone among African countries afflicted with HIV and AIDS, was declining. Data from sentinel sites in antenatal clinics began to show that a sustained reduction in HIV prevalence existed in many (but not all) age groups and regions. This had begun to happen as early as 1989, but in aggregate, the decline was evident from 1992. The decline continued strongly for five years, until 1997, and then began to level out at around 8 percent overall, approximating the power-law curve. This represented a huge reduction from levels of 30 percent registered in western Uganda (Mbarara) and Kampala at the beginning of the decade. By 2003, prevalence remained much lower, in aggregate, than it had been ten years earlier, but by 2006 there were signs of message fatigue and HIV prevalence began to rise again.1 The influence of American policy, largely directed by Christian conservatives in the

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unimagined Community: Sex, Networks, and AIDS in Uganda and South Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 282

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.