The Way Hollywood Tells It: Story and Style in Modern Movies

By David Bordwell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The two archival linchpins of my research, the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research and the Cinémathèque Royale de Belgique, were as usual magnificently cooperative over the ten years during which I gathered material for this book. So thanks to Maxine Fleckner Ducey of Madison, to Gabrielle Claes of Brussels, and to their staffs. I’d also like to thank Ted Turner and Warren Lieberfarb, two far-sighted moguls who have increased our access to the majestic range of American cinema.

Many colleagues encouraged this project, written during my last semester before retiring from the Film Studies area of our department. Joe Beres, Ben Brewster, Kelley Conway, Kevin French, Erik Gunneson, Debbie Hanson, Michele Hilmes, Lea Jacobs, the late Nietzchka Keene, Vance Kepley, Paddy Rourke, Ben Singer, and Andrew Yonda aided me in many ways. J. J. Murphy, who was writing a book on contemporary American film at the same time that I was, proved a constant source of hard questions and fruitful suggestions. Tino Balio let me draw on his vast expertise in the American film industry. He further displayed his wisdom by deciding to retire along with me.

I’ve also benefited from watching American movies with Noël Carroll. Our long comradeship has been a high point of my life. Paul Arthur, Doug Gomery, Jason Mittell, and Jeff Smith offered detailed and very useful criticisms of various versions of these essays. Consultant and filmmaker Tim Onosko, film editor Danny Goldberg, and screenwriter Larry Gross shared information and ideas. In Los Angeles, Cameron Crowe, Andy Fischer, and Susan Antani kindly helped in several ways. Roger Ebert and Nate Kohn expanded my access to contemporary work through their annual Overlooked and Forgotten Film Festival. Special thanks go to John Caldwell of UCLA,

-ix-

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