Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940

By Carl F. Kaestle; Janice A. Radway | Go to book overview

EDITORS’ & AUTHORS’ ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The editors wish to thank the National Endowment for the Humanities for its support of the multivolume project, A History of the Book in America. Without this support, we could not have received the nurturing, evolving, expert help that the board of editors provided to each set of volume editors and from which we benefited greatly. We also wish to thank the general editor of the project, Professor David D. Hall of the Harvard Divinity School, for his leadership, guidance, and support throughout this volume’s long gestation and production. Similarly, great thanks are due to the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), which housed and staffed the project. In particular we thank Ellen Dunlap, president of the society, for her active support of the project and her patience with its pace. For his countless contributions and suggestions, we also thank John B. Hench, vice president for collections and programs at AAS, now retired. Caroline Sloat, director of scholarly publications at AAS, worked tirelessly and expertly to facilitate the completion of this volume, especially in its last stages, supporting us and attending to countless editorial details. Two outside readers undertook fullscale reviews of the manuscript that proved both encouraging and very helpful. Our thanks to Alice Fahs and Ann Fabian, although the remaining shortcomings and infelicities remain ours. Also, our thanks to Katherine S. Simpson at AAS for her detailed and expert help with the illustrations.

Generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities made it possible for the editors and many of the contributors to meet for crucial faceto-face discussions and supported the work of the project’s editorial board. Further financial support has been provided by The Elisabeth Woodburn Fund of the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America, American Booksellers’ Association, the Richard A. Heald Fund, the James J. Colt Foundation, the John Ben Snow Memorial Trust, and the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. We are most grateful for these contributions.

The coeditors thank each other for friendship, mutual support, some fun, and a great deal of learning along the way. We thank our life partners, Liz Hollander and Laurie Shannon, for their support and love and patience.

.  .  .

Carl Kaestle wishes to thank The Spencer Foundation for supporting his research on the history of literacy and print culture, in particular for two research

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