Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940

By Carl F. Kaestle; Janice A. Radway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Diverging Paths
Books and Magazines in the
Transition to Corporate Capitalism

Richard Ohmann

.  .  .

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, magazine publishers radically transformed the economics of their business, which then expanded far more rapidly than book publishing. Because the story is well known,1 it will be abstracted only very briefly here before turning to the main task of this chapter, which is to consider relations between the two businesses and the two forms of print culture, especially from 1880 to 1910, when their differentiation was most intense. The focus here is on monthly magazines, which initially stood in close relationship to books.


Circulation, Price, and Advertising

In 1880 prestigious monthlies such as Harper’s and the Atlantic sold for twentyfive or thirty-five cents an issue and attained modest circulations—probably no higher than 150,000—among cultivated and relatively affluent readers. Like the most successful women’s monthlies (Godey’s Ladies’ Book, Peterson’s Magazine, the Delineator), they carried little advertising, drawing revenue chiefly from subscriptions.

This landscape shifted suddenly in and after 1893, when a price war developed among three new general monthlies: McClure’s, Cosmopolitan, and Munsey’s. The latter was first to set a newsstand price of ten cents, selling subscriptions for a dollar a year. Its circulation rose from 40,000 in October of 1893 to 200,000 the following February. After reaching 500,000 in April, it increased steadily. Cosmopolitan and McClure’s, matching Munsey’s price, reached similar figures soon thereafter. The Ladies’ Home Journal had already established a ten-cent price, but initially did not compete directly with more “general” magazines. By 1900 it became the first to attain a circulation of 1 million copies, and its content increasingly resembled that of the others.

At the Journal, publisher Cyrus Curtis and editor Edward Bok had gradu-

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 669

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.