Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940

By Carl F. Kaestle; Janice A. Radway | Go to book overview

INDEX
Note: Page numbers in italics refer to figures or tables.
A.M.E. Sunday School Union and Publishing House, 343
Abbott, Robert S., 215, 351–54, 356
Abrams v. the United States, 288
Academic professionalization, 202–4, 208–9
Advertising: in African American press, 344–45; by book clubs, 12, 82; book trade and, 55, 103–5, 113–14, 165, 170–71, 173–75, 178; boom in, 178–82; in Catholic press, 398, 407; in The Crisis (periodical), 507; demand for space for, 123–25; display, 125–26; for Harper’s New Books, 174; in Harper’s Weekly, 105; human interest, 182–84; impact of, on newspapers, 128–30; in Library Notes, 607 (n. 9); mail-order publishers and, 173; in mass-market press, 16; for middlebrow books, 114–15; in monthly magazines, 10–11, 51, 102–4, 110, 114; national, 425; in newspapers, 450; by old-line publishers, 175–77; partisan journalism and, 130; Progressive Reformers and, 128; promotion of book “content” and, 185–86; promotion of multiple works, 172–73; on radio shows, 187–88; for Refugee, 180; revenue from, 120, 126; in trade periodicals, 15–16, 175; traditional and modernist, 160–61; typography in, 111; word-of-mouth, 186–87
Advertising agencies, 22, 112
Advice columns, 300, 321
Aesthetic movements, 41–42, 198–99, 211–13, 220, 222–23. See also Modernism; Naturalism; Realism; Romanticism
African American press, 339–41, 344–45, 348–50, 354–57, 496; and religion, 362
African American print culture, 195, 228–31, 339–58, 506
African Americans: as authors, 33–34, 200, 229, 231, 340, 343–44, 351; as booksellers, 491–92; Civilian Conservation Corps and, 357; club women’s newspapers, 496–98, 504–5, 508–10, 617 (n. 38), 618 (n. 48); corporate capitalism and, 14–15; cultural institutions of, 195, 229, 348, 350, 486, 504–8, 617 (n. 41); educated, beliefs of, 504; education for, 225, 228–29, 342, 448, 489; as elocutionists, 343; Great Migration and, 351, 354–58; Harlem Renaissance and, 230–31, 356, 445, 492–93; insurance companies and, 591–92 (n. 31); literacy of, 29, 342, 506–7; literature of, 229–32, 475; New Negro movement, 230–31; newspaper editors, 215; oral traditions of, 492–93; in printing trades, 347–48; professional associations of, 349; public perceptions of, 497; racial identity of, 345; reading and, 474, 491–95, 497, 507–8; repression of, 227; sacred and secular in lives of, 618 (n. 48); soldiers, 341–46; talented tenth, 227–28; writing of, 27. See also Black women’s reading club movement
African Methodist Episcopal Church, 343, 362
Agriculture Department, 266–68, 271–72, 274
ALA. See American Library Association (ALA)

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