Rhetoric and Power: The Drama of Classical Greece

By Nathan Crick | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

It was at the end of my senior year in high school when I first encountered Plato. My grandparents Leo and Elsie Conti had a beautiful wood bookcase at the top of their stairs whose contents had remained unopened for decades. Until that year, I had never really paid any attention to these books, treating them as background in a house that I always considered filled with antiques. A stately, stucco home built in the Tuscan style, it was the product of the labor of my great-grandfather who came to the United States from Italy as a teenager, alone, and who built the house in Springfield, Massachusetts, with his own hands after founding a masonry business. Naturally, such a home, filled with decades of artifacts and memories, was a perfect place for a child to ransack for props for imaginative play, particularly in the basement with its fireplace, its potato cellar, its furnace, and its piles of dusty boxes and pickling jars. And it was good for stories, too. Sometimes, when Leo Conti was in the mood, he would corner the grandchildren and make them listen to him praise the Romans for their invention of the arch and their general possession of that rare character trait that Leo called “fire in the belly.” Then he would challenge us to try to punch him in his sizable belly or try to squeeze his giant hand until he gave in—something which not even my older cousins who joined the military could ever actually make him do. One thing Leo never did was give in.

As I was going off to college, however, I felt the urge to take something else with me from that house along with my fond childhood memories. So I took two books, You Can’t Go Home Again, by Thomas Wolfe, and The Last Days of Plato, a paperback which included the Apology, Crito, and Phaedo. The first book was a sprawling exploration of the upheavals of American society during the 1920s and 1930s, before and after the stock market crash which crushed the illusion of unending prosperity and forced American artists like Wolfe into literary exile as they attempted to envision a new future for the country. The second was a dramatization of philosophy in action, of a life acted according to principle in a time of war, greed, and hypocrisy. It was a vivid demonstration that ideas are weapons, that virtue is emancipatory, and that artists are the educators of history. When I read both books that summer, I did not understand

-xii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rhetoric and Power: The Drama of Classical Greece
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.