Rhetoric and Power: The Drama of Classical Greece

By Nathan Crick | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound (1–8).

2. Podlecki, The Political Background of Aeschylean Tragedy, 105.

3. Herington, “Introduction,” 12.

4. Matthews, “Translator’s Preface,” 154.

5. Hesiod, Theogony, 20.

6. Atwill, Rhetoric Reclaimed, 60.

7. Ibid.

8. Arendt, On Violence, 46.

9. Clearly, speech is often a precondition for mastery of violence, as in the discourses of apprenticeship. An army doctor can only perform a tracheotomy on the battlefield because he or she has gone to school to learn the art. However, violence refers not to preconditions or capacities but the direct act of using material for instrumental ends. Thus, even an illiterate child, acting alone, can blow herself and others to pieces in a crowded marketplace without knowing what she is doing.

10. Havelock, The Liberal Temper in Greek Politics, 57.

11. The Greek gender of the word Bia indicates that Violence is female.

12. Arendt, On Violence, 44.

13. Foucault, “The Subject and Power,” 135.

14. King, Power and Communication, 4.

15. In their basic form, rhetoric handbooks were specifically designed for modeling a proper judicial speech “with a prooemion to secure the interest and good will of the judges, followed by a narrative of the facts, confirmed by probabilities,” and ending with an epilogue. See Aristotle, On Rhetoric, trans. Kennedy, 302.

16. Havelock, The Liberal Temper in Greek Politics, 64.

17. Ibid., 156

18. Ibid., 20.

19. For instance, Prometheus was complicit in Zeus’s overthrow of his father, Kronos. A master of forethought, Prometheus knew that “not by brute strength nor violence could the cause be won, but by guile only” (142–43). The Titans ignored this advice; but Prometheus, knowing the outcome, struck a deal with Zeus to secure his position. As D. J. Conacher writes, “Doing good to one’s (political) friends and evil, extreme evil, to one’s (political) enemies is quite consistent with the climate of the preceding divine power struggles, in which Prometheus himself has played his part on the same terms.”

-227-

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