Stage Money: The Business of the Professional Theater

By Tim Donahue; Jim Patterson | Go to book overview

5
Ticket Pricing

Here’s a way to pass some time on your next airline flight. Ask the folks seated around you how much they paid for their ticket. You might even make a bet on who paid the least. No one is surprised anymore that airline tickets for the same flight can be had for many different prices. Some customers may be puzzled by this fact. “Why is it so hard to know what a seat is worth?” they ask. Others think it’s fun to try and get the lowest price. They study the patterns and have theories as to when is the best time to shop.

Pricing for theater tickets is also highly varied—unless the show is a standingroom-only hit and has no need to discount ticket prices. Similarly some airline flights are not discounted, if demand is high enough. It’s not a good idea to talk while the show is going on, so just linger after the curtain comes down as the rest of the audience leaves and pick up ticket stubs from the floor. You’ll find a number of different prices for seats in the same area of the theater. A New York Times article a few years ago found seven different ticket prices for orchestra seats at a single performance of the musical Rent.

Airlines and theaters use discounted pricing—called price discrimination or yield management or demand-based pricing—for the same reasons. Such pricing is also used by hotels and car rental agencies, again, for the same reasons, because in these businesses there is a particular relationship between revenues and costs, called operating leverage, and because the product they sell is perfectly perishable.

The easy one first: once a plane leaves the jetway, an empty seat is worthless. It cannot be stored up and sold on another day when more people want to fly. The same is true of an empty theater seat once the curtain goes up—worthless. A producer for Rent was quoted as saying that theater seats are like fruit, but he’s wrong. Theater seats are far more perishable than fruit. Incidentally tickets that remain unsold after curtain time are called deadwood in the theater.

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stage Money: The Business of the Professional Theater
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 175

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.