Antiwar Dissent and Peace Activism in World War I America: A Documentary Reader

By Scott H. Bennett; Charles F. Howlett | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Female Activism and Gendered Peacework

4.1. Meta Lilienthal Stern, “To All Women” (1914) and “Girls, Don’t
Marry Pacifists!” (1917)

[Meta Lilienthal Stern edited and contributed to the “Votes for Women” department in the socialist New York Call. This section highlighted news and issues of interest to women—especially socialist women. She was also active on the Socialist Suffrage Campaign Committee in New York. In these two pieces she urges women to organize for peace, while using politicized motherhood language to challenge the notion that peace and war issues should be left to men. In 1914 she urged women to mobilize to prevent U.S. entry into the war. In 1917, one month to the day that President Wilson delivered his war message to Congress, she offered a sardonic commentary on the virtues of military manhood.]


“To All Women” (2 June 1914)

This appeal is directed to every woman who may read it, be she Socialist, Socialist sympathizer, or non-Socialist; be she a suffragist, indifferent, or an anti. There is one question today that should bind all women together, irrespective of their political ideas and affiliations, and that is the question of war or peace. Let every woman who has a husband she loves or a son she has brought up with care and tenderness, or a father or brother or friend whose life is dear to her, every woman who believes in kindness and usefulness and happiness—in one word—every woman who is womanly in the best sense of the word—let her do everything within her limited power to prevent the United States of America from being dragged into this holocaust of war!

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Antiwar Dissent and Peace Activism in World War I America: A Documentary Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.