Antiwar Dissent and Peace Activism in World War I America: A Documentary Reader

By Scott H. Bennett; Charles F. Howlett | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
The Cultural Front and Antiwar Protest

ANTIWAR PLAYS

8.1. Frank P. O’Hare and Kate Richards O’Hare, World Peace (1915)

[Frank O’Hare and his wife, Kate, were midwestern socialists. Kate ran for U.S. Congress on the SP ticket in 1910, edited the St. Louis– based socialist periodical the National Rip-Saw, and in 1917 was imprisoned for an antiwar speech. The O’Hares dedicated their 1915 play, World Peace, “to the world peace and human brotherhood that can be realized when co-operation and justice have replaced competition and militarism in world commerce.” In the final act the “Drummer,” who references baseball, calls upon peace mediators to end this tragic conflagration as soon as possible.]


… ACT III

The stage is set to represent a great council chamber. About the walls are hung the flags of all nations and on the back wall hangs a great map of Europe all splashed with blood.

(LEFT) Seated in ornate chairs are the King of England, the King of Belgium, the King of Servia, the King of Italy, the Czar of Russia and the President of France; the Kaiser, the Emperor of AustriaHungary and the Sultan. The European statesmen, bankers, business men and the armament maker are standing just behind the rulers.

(CENTER) Seated about a long table are the Mediators—America, Columbia, Peace, History and Democracy. Standing just behind them are Medical Science, Red Cross, Charity, Religion and Messenger, American banker, business man and speculator, and the “drummer.”

(RIGHT) The common people of all nations….

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