Antiwar Dissent and Peace Activism in World War I America: A Documentary Reader

By Scott H. Bennett; Charles F. Howlett | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Aftermath and Legacies

10.1. Archibald E. Stevenson, “Who’s Who in Pacifism and
Radicalism” (25 January 1919)

[In 1918 and 1919 the Overman Committee, a subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee chaired by Lee Overman, investigated German and Bolshevik influences in America. Testifying before the committee, Archibald E. Stevenson listed sixty-two radicals who had opposed World War I. This list included prominent peace activists, along with the wartime organizations in which they were affiliated—a “Who’s Who in Pacifism and Radicalism.” The Senate hearings and Stevenson’s list illustrate how the postwar Red Scare targeted antiwar dissidents and peace advocates.]

There was placed today into the record of the Senate Committee which is investigating German propaganda the names of sixty-two men and women who have been recorded as active in movements which did not help the United States when the country was fighting the Central Powers. The original list contained more than 100 names, and about 50 per cent of them were eliminated as a result of an executive session of the committee.

The various organizations named include the most prominent of the so-called pacifist and radical movements in this country. The names now in the Senate records are those of clergymen, professors, lawyers, writers, Socialists, labor leaders, architects, an I.W.W. agitator, and one former publisher of a New York newspaper.

The list was originally submitted by Archibald E. Stevenson of the Military Intelligence Service, who brought to the attention of the committee that there was such a list in existence when testifying regarding

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