Grizzly West: A Failed Attempt to Reintroduce Grizzly Bears in the Mountain West

By Michael J. Dax | Go to book overview

2
Endangered Species, Environmental
Politics, and the American West

By the 1990s Catron County, New Mexico, was in trouble. Its economy, which relied heavily on extractive industries, was in a steep decline, and the resources on which those industries depended fared even worse. Decades of overuse had left the high, arid forests of the Gila National Forest a ghost of what they had once been. Grasslands had been overgrazed, forests overlogged, and as a result, spring snowmelt quickly drained from the hillsides. With no vegetation to trap the water, the rivers and streams surged to previously unseen levels, erosion increased, and the land was in the process of being wholly transformed. Fish and wildlife populations suffered as a result, and the region’s defining character was being undermined after a hundred years of taking from the land without consideration for the long-term effects. When the U.S. Forest Service attempted to rehabilitate and restore the land by limiting logging and supporting wildlife populations, the agency quickly became the target of local land users who declared the county under siege by the federal government.

By co-opting a federal land law intended to protect Native American heritage sites, Catron County claimed the federal government was not respecting its “culture and customs” as the law required. Rewriting the county’s own laws, Catron essentially invoked a nullification argument in which the county had the right to trump federal laws with which it disagreed. At the symbolic center of this debate

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Grizzly West: A Failed Attempt to Reintroduce Grizzly Bears in the Mountain West
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Abbreviations x
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Grizzly Americana 17
  • 2- Endangered Species, Environmental Politics, and the American West 45
  • 3- Wolf Recovery Sets the Stage 69
  • 4- The Advent of the Roots Coalition and the Environmental Impact Statement 91
  • 5- Environmental Resistance 115
  • 6- Ethical Controversies and the Draft Environmental Impact Statement 137
  • 7- The Divided West 165
  • 8- Triumph and Collapse 187
  • Conclusion 217
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 265
  • Index 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 289

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.