José Martí, the United States, and Race

By Anne Fountain | Go to book overview

Preface

A chance meeting with Franklin Knight, renowned historian of Caribbean slavery, in the Santiago airport in January 2013 led to a discussion about the continuing fascination of U.S. citizens with Cuba and with United States and Cuba connections over time. We were both leading groups of American citizens eager to travel the length of the island, Knight heading a group from Johns Hopkins University and my husband and I guiding travelers from San Jose, California. Barely five months later, as I spoke with Nancy Morejón, acclaimed Afro-Cuban poet, at a dinner in her honor in California, the conversation turned to José Martí, poetry, and race. The topics seemed bound together effortlessly. History, poetry, and race relations all linked José Martí and Cuba to the United States and to the high level of interest in Martí’s life and works today. They are all components of what is covered in this book, which should be of interest to many constituencies.

José Martí (1853–1895), Cuba’s national hero, spent one-third of his life outside of Cuba. He lived in the United States for nearly fifteen years, 1880–95, and became a prolific chronicler of life in the Gilded Age. An observer of the North American scene in all its facets, Martí reported on and analyzed U.S. race relations and incorporated these commentaries into his own thinking. Martí had seen firsthand the brutal treatment of slaves in the Cuban countryside, and, as a young man in Havana, had mourned the death of Lincoln, who symbolized the end of slavery in the United States. But while he was living away from Cuba, Martí’s horizons in regard to race broadened markedly. In the United States he stayed in the home of a black family, taught in a black school, and had interactions with people of color of all classes, including former slaves. New York provided a vibrant panorama of immigrants from Europe and the labor politics that accompanied them.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
José Martí, the United States, and Race
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Content vii
  • Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Cuba’s Most Universal Man 1
  • 2 - Martí and Race, an Overview 12
  • 3 - Black Cubans in the United States 34
  • 4 - African Americans and the Post–Civil War United States 48
  • 5 - Chronicles of the Crusaders 59
  • 6 - Native Americans and "Nuestra AMérica" 77
  • 7 - Immigrant Communities 96
  • 8- Challenging the Colossus - Responses to U.S. Racism 105
  • 9 - Conclusions 119
  • Notes 133
  • Bibliography 145
  • Index 155
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 162

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.