Mississippian Mortuary Practices: Beyond Hierarchy and the Representationist Perspective

By Lynne P. Sullivan; Robert C. Mainfort Jr. | Go to book overview

7
Mississippian Dimensions of
a Fort Ancient Mortuary Program
The Development of Authority and
Spatial Grammar at Sun Watch Village

ROBERT A. COOK

Interregional studies have long been hampered by essentialist categories, which are attributable in archaeology to cultural-historical frameworks designed for other purposes (Dunnell 1971; Essenpreis 1978; Hart and Brumbach 2003; Pauketat 2001b; Lyman and O’Brien 1998). Several researchers of Fort Ancient evolution have concluded that Mississippian migrations and interactions stimulated Fort Ancient development (Cowan 1987; Essenpreis 1978; Griffin 1943; Prufer and Shane 1970), while others have denied any significant outside influence on the development of the Fort Ancient way of life (Henderson 1998; Pollack and Henderson 1992, 2000). This view regards the influence at any point to be relatively insignificant due to the absence of a clearly identifiable elite and hierarchical settlement pattern in Fort Ancient cases (Griffin 1992). But as is discussed and demonstrated in this volume and elsewhere, we can no longer assume that a clearly identifiable elite and a hierarchical settlement pattern were universal characteristics of Mississippian societies.

Mississippian and Fort Ancient communities also are commonly described as chiefdoms and tribes, respectively, the outcomes of different evolutionary pathways. The limitations of the chiefdom model (and by implication the tribe) for revealing the diversity inherent in late prehistoric societies of eastern North America also are now apparent. There are a number of exceptions to the chiefdom model (Boudreaux 2007a; Cobb 2003; Goldstein 1991; Hammerstedt 2005; Sullivan 1995). Some have sought to understand the exceptions as various points on the pathway to complexity in relation to environmental variations (e.g., Clay 1976), while others have suggested more recently that we abandon the chiefdom concept altogether (e.g., Pauketat 2007).

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mississippian Mortuary Practices: Beyond Hierarchy and the Representationist Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.