Mississippian Mortuary Practices: Beyond Hierarchy and the Representationist Perspective

By Lynne P. Sullivan; Robert C. Mainfort Jr. | Go to book overview

12
Mortuary Practices and Cultural Identity at the
Turn of the Sixteenth Century in Eastern Tennessee

LYNNE P. SULLIVAN AND MICHAELYN S. HARLE

Culturally ascribed identity groups “are based on the expression of a real or assumed shared culture and common descent” (Jones 1997:84). Cultural identity can be correlated with suites of cultural practices or traditions, especially those related to ritual and symbolic practices (Beck 1995), and those that differentiate various social dimensions, such as gender and status differentiation or the organization of space (see Eriksen 1991). The importance of cultural identity as a social boundary and the impact it can have on human relationships encourages efforts to examine such differences among peoples in the prehistoric past.

Data concerning mortuary practices are well suited for making observations related to cultural identity. Mortuary practices are among the most symbolically charged cultural practices that can be archaeologically observed (Beck 1995; Emberling 1997; Emerson and Hargrave 2000). Mortuary practices also can provide insights into ritual and into differentiation across social dimensions such as gender and status. But just as differences in pottery styles may not correlate directly with social boundaries (Wobst 1977; but see Bowser 2000), differences in mortuary practices alone may not reflect difference in cultural identity. A case must be built that uses mortuary practices to recognize multiple dimensions of cultural practice and tradition. This case should be bolstered with analyses from other data classes that can indicate cultural differences so profound that they likely relate to past peoples’ constructions of differing cultural identities.

We examine multiple dimensions of mortuary practices observed at two contemporaneous late Mississippian sites in order to revisit a long-standing discussion in the archaeology of Eastern Tennessee about the relationship and cultural identities of the Mouse Creek and Dallas phases. In the 1940s, Lewis and Kneberg (1946) correlated these archaeological complexes with differing cultural groups, the Yuchi and Creek, respectively. Mortuary practices were

-234-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mississippian Mortuary Practices: Beyond Hierarchy and the Representationist Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.