Precision and Purpose: Airpower in the Libyan Civil War

By Gregory Alegi; Christian F. Anrig et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
Timeline of Events in Libya

Compiler’s Note

Every effort has been made to ensure this timeline of events in 2011 is as accurate as possible. When necessary, sources were verified against other timelines or newspaper articles; however, only the primary source for the item has been cited in the endnotes. Some events, especially the capture of cities, may cover several days. For ease of understanding, a single day, normally the most commonly referenced, was chosen. Timeline entries without sources were derived from the chapters contained in the report; please see the relevant chapter for citation.

DateMilitary EventsPolitical Events
February 15–16Anti-regime protests erupt in Benghazi
February 17A national “Day of Rage” is held throughout Libya
February 20Opposition forces secure control of Benghazi
February 21Two Libyan air force (LARAF) pilots defect to Malta.1 LARAF pilots at Banina Air Base (Benghazi) defect to the rebelsLibyan Interior Minister Abdul Fattah Younis al Abidi, defects from the Qaddafi regime, joining the opposition.2,3
February 22Portuguese and Dutch C-130s deploy to Sigonella to conduct Non-Combatant Evacuations (NEO)Qaddafi, in a televised address, vows to remain in power and die as a “martyr” if necessary. 4,5 The Arab League suspends Libyan membership.6
February 23Misrata falls to opposition forces.7French President Nicolas Sarkozy calls for sanctions against Libya.8
February 24UK begins NEO of its nationals.9
February 25U.S. citizens evacuated from Libya as the ferry Maria Delores departs from TripoliU.S. Department of State suspends embassy operations in Libya.10
February 26Ajdabiyah falls to opposition forces.11 Canada’s NEO, code-named Operation Mobile, beginsUnited Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 1970 (UNSCR 1970), authorizing an arms embargo against Libya.12 Canada suspends its diplomatic mission in Libya, withdrawing its staff from its embassy

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