English Heart, Hindi Heartland: The Political Life of Literature in India

By Rashmi Sadana | Go to book overview

Notes

PROLOGUE
1. For instance, in the classic critiques of imperialist ideology by Aimé Césaire (1950), Frantz Fanon (1961), Edward Said (1978, 1993), Gayatri Spivak (1985, 1987), and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o (1986), as well as a host of other foundational studies delving into the nature of colonial rule and colonial and postcolonial discourse, including Ashis Nandy (1983), Gauri Viswanathan (1989), Ashcroft, Griffiths, and Tiffin (1989), Sara Suleri (1992), Homi Bhabha (1994), Mrinalini Sinha (1995), Ann Stoler (1995), and Robert Young (2001).
2. The following works enabled me to think more imaginatively about the study of texts and society, the relationship between academic disciplines, and the relationship between literature and society in India: Bernard Cohn (1987, 1996), Nicholas Dirks (1993), Brinkley Messick (1993), Stefania Pandolfo (1997), Lawrence Cohen (2000), and the volumes edited by E. Valentine Daniel (1996) and Jonathan Boyarin (1993) in the realm of anthropology; and in regard to Indian literary and political modernities, the volumes edited by Svati Joshi (1991) and Rajeswari Sunder Rajan (1992) and essays by Sudipta Kaviraj (2010).

CHAPTER 1
1. The novel had already won the Commonwealth Prize for First Novel in the “Eurasia section” in 1998, which might have been why it became a question on the show to begin with, but I avoided this chicken-and-egg intervention.
2. The Inheritance of Loss sold 2,000 copies when it was first published in India, and 70,000 more soon after winning the Man Booker Prize in 2006.
3. Which books make it to the pavements is perhaps the best indicator of what people are reading (as this snapshot from 2007 indicates) or what is

-181-

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English Heart, Hindi Heartland: The Political Life of Literature in India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Flashpoints ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue - The Slush Pile xiii
  • Chapter 1- Reading Delhi and beyond 1
  • Chapter 2- Two Tales of a City 29
  • Chapter 3- In Sujan Singh Park 48
  • Chapter 4- The Two Brothers of Ansari Road 71
  • Chapter 5- At the Sahitya Akademi 94
  • Chapter 6- Across the Yamuna 116
  • Chapter 7- "A Suitable Text for a Vegetarian Audience" 136
  • Chapter 8- Indian Literature Abroad 153
  • Chapter 9- Conclusion 175
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 215
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