Mexican New York: Transnational Lives of New Immigrants

By Robert Courtney Smith | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people and institutions have aided the writing of this book over seventeen years. Most critical was support for two years of leave, from 1999 to 2001, funded by fellowships from the Spencer Foundation/National Academy of Education; the Social Science Research Council, the Program on International Migration, with funds from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; and the Oral History Research Office at Columbia University, with funds from the Rockefeller Foundation. A generous grant and supplement from the Sociology Program of the National Science Foundation (grant number SES-9731280) funded critical travel, teaching relief, and research assistance; thanks to William Bainbridge, Patricia White, and Joane Nagel. The Social Science Research Council, through its Urban Underclass Program, and the National Science Foundation, through its Grants to Improve Doctoral Dissertations, supported the dissertation that began this research. A $2,500 seed grant and 40 percent sabbatical leave were provided by Barnard College.

My intellectual debts are also numerous. Saskia Sassen, Alejandro Portes, and Marcelo and Carola Suarez-Orozco have written countless letters on my behalf and opened up ways of looking in their work that readers will see reflected in this book. Chuck Tilly, Sudhir Venkatesh, Beth Bernstein, Nicole Marwell, and Nick de Genova read large portions of the manuscript and offered valuable comments. Herb Gans and Kathy Neckerman offered insights that helped me secure funding to finish the book. Manuel Garcia y Griego, Meg Crahan, John Mollenkopf, Phil Kasinitz, and Roger Waldinger offered excellent advice, almost none of which, alas, I followed. My year as a Rockefeller Fellow in Oral History at Columbia opened up my interviewing, thinking, and writing; thanks to Mary Marshall Clark, Ron Grele, and the Fellows. I also thank Wayne Cornelius, Roger Rouse, David Kyle, Ari

-xi-

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