Mexican New York: Transnational Lives of New Immigrants

By Robert Courtney Smith | Go to book overview

6. “In Ticuani, He Goes Crazy”
The Second Generation Renegotiates Gender

The gender negotiations of the first generation must seem easy to their children. For the first generation, ranchero masculinity is still a dominant ideology, even if other gender practices coexist with it. But the second generation negotiates gender in three contexts: various hegemonic and nonhegemonic “Mexican” and “American” notions of masculinity and femininity, nagging generational questions of ethnic authenticity and nostalgia, and an immigrant narrative of upward mobility that they experience as an “immigrant bargain” with their parents. Hence, second-generation Mexican American boys must figure out how to become Mexican American men while trying to fit the hegemonic images of the macho ranchero, the white middle-class man, the striving immigrant, and other Mexican and American stereotypes, while also redeeming their parents’ sacrifice in coming to the United States by succeeding in school and at work. Similarly, second-generation Mexican American girls must figure out how to become Mexican American women while engaging the images of the deferential ranchera, the autonomous and pioneering female migrant, and the secondgeneration New York career woman, and doing well in school, taking care of the men in their parents’ home, and marrying good men and having careers and children. If this is exhausting to read, imagine living it!1

Transnational life offers a clear view of second-generation Mexican American gender ideologies, bargains, and practices because it is a site in which they are challenged and renegotiated, and through which members of the second generation seek to authenticate or legitimize their Mexicanness. I was able to observe at length the relationship of Julia and Toño, the son of Tomás Maestro, novios in their mid-twenties who grew up in New York and regularly returned together to Ticuani. (Although the word novios is translated as meaning simply a boyfriend-girlfriend couple, in

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mexican New York: Transnational Lives of New Immigrants
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 375

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.