Mexican New York: Transnational Lives of New Immigrants

By Robert Courtney Smith | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1. TRANSNATIONAL LIFE IN
ETHNOGRAPHIC PERSPECTIVE

1. Lamont (2000) offers a different but fascinating analysis of moral maps.

2. To emphasize the importance of Ticuani in anchoring transnational life, and also the insistence of those in Ticuani that they have the right to define who is and is not authentically Ticuanense, I use the term local mainly to refer to people now living in Ticuani. For Ticuanenses living in New York who visit, I use returnees or a similar term. For interactions in New York, especially with those with other ethnic groups that have been in a neighborhood longer than Mexicans, I usually use racial and ethnic terms, which are more salient in such encounters. See Jess and Massey 1995 on how power determines the definition of local.

3. See R. Smith 2003a,b, 1998a,b, 1993, 2001b; Goldring 2001; Guarnizo 1998; Portes 1999; Espinosa 1998; Moctezuma Longoria 2003a,b; Delgado Wise 2003.

4. Harvey (1989) argues that new technology and ways of organizing economic life “compress” time and space so that distances no longer have the same meaning. International economic transactions that previously took weeks now take seconds. Sassen (1999), Pessar and Mahler (2003), Massey, Goldring, and Durand (1994), and Doreen Massey and Jess (1995) note that time-space compression is not simply a matter of technology but also of having access to such technology. Ticuanenses are a relatively powerless group in the sense that their actions do not significantly affect global capitalism. But because of their location in the United States and in migrant-sending regions of Mexico where such technologies now coexist with older forms of economic and political organization, they have become powerful in their own community.

5. On earlier diasporas, see Cohen 1995; Gabaccia 2000; Glick-Schiller 1999; Foner 1997, 1999; R. Smith 2000, 2003b.

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mexican New York: Transnational Lives of New Immigrants
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 375

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.