Speak, Bird, Speak Again: Palestinian Arab Folktales

By Ibrahim Muhawi; Sharif Kanaana | Go to book overview

Footnote Index
References are to tale number followed by footnote number, with a brief subject identification.
Agriculture. See also Plants and Animals
12–11 Stone wall terraces
13–8 Girls herd camels
18–8 Crowing of the cock
20–2 Chickens in the yard
26–6 Plowing
26–13 Horse trough
26–14 Ox goad
34–3 Wheat ground by hand
37–6 Sesame and watermelon
38–2 Threshing floor
38–3 Draft animals and plowing
39–4 Dung as fuel
40–7 Draft animals and plowing
Animals. See Agriculture; Bird Sym bolism; Plants and Animals
Authority and Government
5–2 Divan
5–3 Kissing the hand
5–9 Vizier
10–1 King and emir
12–5 “Drink from the other”
15–11 Effendi
22–7 Sheikh
22–20 Pasha and bey
35–3 Sheikh
44–5 Judge (cadi)
44–9 Judge’s deputy (maʾzūn)
44–15 Shrewd vizier
Baths, Public
25–1 Public baths
25–7 Toiletries taken to baths
Beauty. See also Costume and Cosmetics
2– 1 Face like the moon
7–8 Girl like the moon
13–2 Face like cheese
17–1 Girl like gazelle
21–3 Blood on the snow
21–9 Houri
25–2 Fair skin
35–1 Bride like a pomegranate
Bird Symbolism
9–7 Bird in wedding songs
10–9 Sexual symbolism
11–5 Bird as bride
12–1 Bird as lover
13 –11 Bird as symbol
Blackening with Soot
1 –11 Reputation blackened
13–8 Disguise
41–5 Mourning
Blessings. See Prayers, Invocations, Curses, and Vows
Brothers. See Children; Siblings
Calendar, Lunar: 33–5

-413-

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Speak, Bird, Speak Again: Palestinian Arab Folktales
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Note on Transliteration xvii
  • Key to References xix
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes on Presentation and Translation 51
  • Group I - Individuals 53
  • Children and Parents 55
  • Siblings 84
  • Sexual Awakening and Courtship 115
  • The Quest for the Spouse 148
  • Group II - Family 173
  • Brides and Bridegrooms 175
  • Husbands and Wives 206
  • Group III - Society 251
  • Group IV - Environment 279
  • Group V - Universe 295
  • Folkloristic Analysis 327
  • Appendix A- Transliteration of Tale 10 381
  • Appendix B- Index of Folk Motifs 387
  • Appendix C- List of Tales by Type 403
  • Selected Bibliography 405
  • Footnote Index 413
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