Word of Mouth: What We Talk about When We Talk about Food

By Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
Iconic Cooks

Food talk is for every age, every society, and every person. Nevertheless, in the West, the exemplary food talkers, the most enthusiastic culinary conversationalists, the writers of cookbooks and the authors of gastronomic commentary mostly are, and certainly were, Greek and Roman, French, English, and German. Where, Americans might well ask, are we? The quick answer is that Americans were learning the language of food talk. Joining the culinary conversation meant learning to talk about food meaningfully and effectively. It meant agreeing about essentials.

And this Americans learned from our cooks. It was not the gastronome or the gourmet or the high-powered chef who taught us how to eat and talk about food knowledgeably and interestingly. It was cooks—women, not men—who translated gastronomy into the practices of everyday life and made good food a matter for discussion. Once American women took it upon themselves to talk about their cooking—and especially, to write it down— and once Americans were ready to listen, Americans could start talking about food for real.


WOMEN’S WORK AND WOMEN’S WORDS

When it comes to ranking occupations, cooking has long labored under two handicaps. First, necessity. The repetitive preparation of food—day in, day out—has to happen. Everyone has to eat, and someone has to see to the

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Word of Mouth: What We Talk about When We Talk about Food
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • California Studies in Food and Culture ii
  • Title Page vii
  • Contents xi
  • Prologue xiii
  • Part I - From Talk to Text 1
  • Chapter One - Thinking about Food 3
  • Chapter Two - The Perils and Pleasures of Consumption 33
  • Chapter Three - Texts Take over 50
  • Part II - New Cooks, New Chefs 77
  • Chapter Four - Iconic Cooks 79
  • Chapter Five - Chefs and Chefing 113
  • Part III - The Culinary Landscape in the Twenty-First Century 139
  • Chapter Six - Dining on the Edge 141
  • Chapter Seven - Haute Food 170
  • Epilogue 197
  • Acknowledgments 205
  • Notes 207
  • References 251
  • Films 265
  • Index 267
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.