Word of Mouth: What We Talk about When We Talk about Food

By Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson | Go to book overview

NOTES

PROLOGUE

Stories about Food

Marcel Mauss first identified “total social phenomena” in The Gift ([1925] 1990). Mauss analyzed the structure of gift exchange, but he might as well have been talking about food. He wrote: “In these ‘total’ social phenomena, as we propose calling them, all kinds of institutions are given expression at one and the same time—juridical, religious, and moral, which relate to both politics and the family; likewise economic ones, which suppose special forms of production and consumption, or rather, of performing total services and distribution. This is not to take into account the aesthetic phenomena to which these facts lead, and the contours of the phenomena that these institutions manifest” (3–4).

A live performance of “Bread and Butter” is available on YouTube at www. youtube.com/watch?v=LdXWojZKNGE. The Newbeats were Larry Henley (lead singer) and brothers Dean and Mark Mathis (backup singers), all Southerners. “Bread and Butter” was written by Larry Parks and Jay Turnbow.

I discovered the song and video together in 2010 as I was surfing the Internet in search of a song about mashed potatoes. Based on my admittedly idiosyncratic survey, “Bread and Butter” turns out to have had an extensive public. At last count, one of the several YouTube video sites devoted to this song had over

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Word of Mouth: What We Talk about When We Talk about Food
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • California Studies in Food and Culture ii
  • Title Page vii
  • Contents xi
  • Prologue xiii
  • Part I - From Talk to Text 1
  • Chapter One - Thinking about Food 3
  • Chapter Two - The Perils and Pleasures of Consumption 33
  • Chapter Three - Texts Take over 50
  • Part II - New Cooks, New Chefs 77
  • Chapter Four - Iconic Cooks 79
  • Chapter Five - Chefs and Chefing 113
  • Part III - The Culinary Landscape in the Twenty-First Century 139
  • Chapter Six - Dining on the Edge 141
  • Chapter Seven - Haute Food 170
  • Epilogue 197
  • Acknowledgments 205
  • Notes 207
  • References 251
  • Films 265
  • Index 267
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